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Books on Dream Interpretation

ISBN 0-919123-04-X. 84 illustrations. Index. 288 pp. 1980. $40.00

Shows the secret goal of alchemy to be the transformation of the personality and the search for wholeness. Invaluable for interpreting images in modern dreams and for understanding relationships.


ISBN 0-919123-12-0. Index. 128 pp. 1983. $25.00

Comprehensive guide to an understanding of dreams in light of the basic principles of analytical psychology. Particular attention to common motifs, the role of complexes, and the goal and purpose of dreams.


44. The Dream Story
Donald Broadribb
ISBN 0-919123-45-7. Index. 256 pp. 1990. $35.00

A rare weave of theory and application, drawing on various schools of psychology, with a particular strength in tracking recurring symbols in a series of dreams. A solid workbook for those seeking an understanding of dreams in the context of everyday life. Numerous examples.


ISBN 0-919123-92-9. Index. 128 pp. 2000. $25.00

Thousands of years before Freud and Jung, “visions in the night” were an important source of divine guidance, and the role of dream interpreter was an established profession. The author examines ancient, medieval and modern literature for insights that illuminate a Jungian approach to the value of dreamwork in the analytic process. Includes case material. 2nd Edtion, revised.


110. The Passion of Perpetua: A Psychological Interpretation of Her Visions
Marie-Louise von Franz
Edited by Daryl Sharp
ISBN 1-894574-11-7. 8 illustrations. Index. Sewn. 96 pp. 2004. $25.00

This book started life as an academic study for a seminar with C.G. Jung. It was first published in English translation in 1949, then published in German in 1951 as a supplement to Jung’s volume Aion. St. Perpetua—patron saint of mothers in the Catholic pantheon—was an African Christian martyred in 203 A.D. She lived her truth to her last moment. Those not familiar with Perpetua’s story will nevertheless appreciate this book because of the psychological understanding that von Franz brought to everything she focused on. In this circumambulation of the events and visions of the saint’s life, we are fortunate to hear the clear voices of two strong women. As always, Marie-Louise von Franz shares insights of immediate value that are both deeply erudite and strikingly practical.


113. The use of dreams in couple counseling: A Jungian Perspective
Renée Nell
Translated by Sandra S. Jellinghaus
ISBN 1-894574-14-1. Index. 160 pp. 2005. $25.00

Psychotherapists of many different schools use dreams in individual therapy, but very few use them in counseling couples. Indeed, marriage and family therapists often have no experience in this area because dream interpretation is seldom included in their training.

Jung sees the dream as the steady endeavor of the unconscious to create the best possible equilibrium in the psyche. Dreams are a means to establish a homeostatic balance, or at least to show the dreamer what would be necessary to achieve this balance.

In this book, with the help of numerous examples, Dr. Nell explains the efficacy of dream interpretation when working with couples, individually and in groups, in the diagnosis and treatment of emotional disturbances.

One of the main tasks in the psychological individuation process is the reconciliation of opposites, especially the opposition between consciousness and the unconscious. Dreams create a bridge between these two worlds.

Renée Nell, Ph.D. (1910-1994), founded the Jungian residential treatment center, The Country Place, in Litchfield, CT, where she served for many years as director and senior therapist. The Use of Dreams in Couple Counseling was translated from the original German by Sandra S. Jellinghaus. There is a brief excerpt in the Jung at Heart newsletter, no. 42.